Why You Shouldn’t Buy Art and A Song by William Powhida“20x200 is one opportunity to offer art on a human scale out of personal necessity and to make the price itself a political statement. This edition is very much about the ambivalence of making art within a market economy. I do this in spite of the disgust and humiliation of luxury.”—William Powhida, in his artist statement for Why You Shouldn’t Buy Art. Each of Powhida’s newest prints is powerful in its own distinct way. Jeffrey Teuton, Director of Jen Bekman Gallery, offers an eloquent breakdown of both works. “As a pairing that might seem incongruous—one of them seemingly snarling in the face of the art world, the other embracing it all warm and fuzzy—but that I, an enthusiast of snarky and self deprecating humor, find complement each other perfectly,” he writes. Read more. A portion of the proceeds from A Song will benefit the non-profit Occupy Sandy Recovery, a coordinated relief effort to distribute resources and volunteers to help neighborhoods and people affected by Hurricane Sandy.
Why You Shouldn’t Buy Art and A Song by William Powhida“20x200 is one opportunity to offer art on a human scale out of personal necessity and to make the price itself a political statement. This edition is very much about the ambivalence of making art within a market economy. I do this in spite of the disgust and humiliation of luxury.”—William Powhida, in his artist statement for Why You Shouldn’t Buy Art. Each of Powhida’s newest prints is powerful in its own distinct way. Jeffrey Teuton, Director of Jen Bekman Gallery, offers an eloquent breakdown of both works. “As a pairing that might seem incongruous—one of them seemingly snarling in the face of the art world, the other embracing it all warm and fuzzy—but that I, an enthusiast of snarky and self deprecating humor, find complement each other perfectly,” he writes. Read more. A portion of the proceeds from A Song will benefit the non-profit Occupy Sandy Recovery, a coordinated relief effort to distribute resources and volunteers to help neighborhoods and people affected by Hurricane Sandy.

Why You Shouldn’t Buy Art and A Song by William Powhida

“20x200 is one opportunity to offer art on a human scale out of personal necessity and to make the price itself a political statement. This edition is very much about the ambivalence of making art within a market economy. I do this in spite of the disgust and humiliation of luxury.”—William Powhida, in his artist statement for Why You Shouldn’t Buy Art.

Each of Powhida’s newest prints is powerful in its own distinct way. Jeffrey Teuton, Director of Jen Bekman Gallery, offers an eloquent breakdown of both works. “As a pairing that might seem incongruous—one of them seemingly snarling in the face of the art world, the other embracing it all warm and fuzzy—but that I, an enthusiast of snarky and self deprecating humor, find complement each other perfectly,” he writes. Read more.

A portion of the proceeds from A Song will benefit the non-profit Occupy Sandy Recovery, a coordinated relief effort to distribute resources and volunteers to help neighborhoods and people affected by Hurricane Sandy.