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Slurp and Salty by Michelle Vaughan
An oyster lover, artist Michelle Vaughan uses text to capture the action of eating the popular shellfish. And the delicate pink coloring? Vaughan chose this shade for its resemblance to the interiors of oyster shells. Even the Hamilton Gothic typeface, originally owned by the Baltimore Police Department, is meant to evoke Vaughan’s favorite food. “It is a clean, honest face for everyday use,” says the artist. “Oysters were once the everyman’s food, eaten by rich and poor alike—Gothic symbolizes this spirit.”
Prints of these editions begin at $60. 
Slurp and Salty by Michelle Vaughan
An oyster lover, artist Michelle Vaughan uses text to capture the action of eating the popular shellfish. And the delicate pink coloring? Vaughan chose this shade for its resemblance to the interiors of oyster shells. Even the Hamilton Gothic typeface, originally owned by the Baltimore Police Department, is meant to evoke Vaughan’s favorite food. “It is a clean, honest face for everyday use,” says the artist. “Oysters were once the everyman’s food, eaten by rich and poor alike—Gothic symbolizes this spirit.”
Prints of these editions begin at $60. 

Slurp and Salty by Michelle Vaughan

An oyster lover, artist Michelle Vaughan uses text to capture the action of eating the popular shellfish. And the delicate pink coloring? Vaughan chose this shade for its resemblance to the interiors of oyster shells. Even the Hamilton Gothic typeface, originally owned by the Baltimore Police Department, is meant to evoke Vaughan’s favorite food. “It is a clean, honest face for everyday use,” says the artist. “Oysters were once the everyman’s food, eaten by rich and poor alike—Gothic symbolizes this spirit.”

Prints of these editions begin at $60. 

ny.11.#12 by Jennifer Sanchez
10”x8” ($20) | 14”x11” ($50) | 20”x16” ($200) | 30”x24” ($1000)

In the newsletter, Sara writes:

Last we introduced one of Jennifer Sanchez's new works, we were nestled along the shore of the Atlantic, awaiting the arrival of Hurricane Irene. Picking up where we left off—we’re introducing ny.11.#02's sister print, ny.11.#12.

The pair of prints marks a departure in Jennifer’s work. Her signature spontaneous, multi-colored swirls and drips have been replaced by a subdued color palette and slightly more orderly composition. True to form, though, she’s left evidence of her process—layers and marks that render the surface deliciously smudgy. As her work has changed over the years, we’ve been here to watch and share it with you.

Jennifer is one of five artists featured in our collaboration with West Elm—a partnership that’s brought her work, along with that of Sean GreeneJoe KievittCarol Padberg and Bert Teunissen, to a large audience of art and design lovers. Our collaboration includes this weekend’s (rescheduled post-hurricane) Living With Art + The Art of Livingdesign talk with Jen. If you’re in NYC, stop by on Saturday to hear her tips on collecting and living with art:

Living With Art + The Art of Living
Saturday, October 8th, 10–11 a.m.
West Elm
1870 Broadway, New York, NY
Call the store to RSVP: 212-247-8077

Hope to see you then!

New on 20x200: Overheard on the Titanic by Austin Kleon

10”x8” ($20) | 14”x11” ($50) | 20”x16” ($200) 

In the newsletter, Jen writes:

I introduced Austin’s The Travelogue shortly after returning from my Austin-with-Austin travels and what I wrote back then is still the best description I can think of to describe why I find Austin’s work so enchanting:

His selection-by-omission practice is the semi-illogical next step in a process that I go through constantly, one which I’ve pursued, involuntarily at times, for as long as I can remember being able to read. Nearly all my reading is a swim against an undercurrent of my unending search for a motto, a rallying cry or a mantra. Whether it’s a poignant refrain of a pop song, a quote from a dead person or a few lines swiped from an admired poet, my constant search for a few good words is… constant. But, my ceaseless scanning of a page for a string of resonant words is thoroughly trumped by Austin’s talent for stringing them together. He doesn’t find poetry, he makes it—and he doesn’t just make it, he publishes it. Which is to say that this creative-writing-major-with-a-concentration-in-poetry college dropout makes me both green with envy and glowing with pride.


New on 20x200: Untitled, from the series Aggressive Girls by Chikara Umihara

8”x10” ($20) | 11”x14” ($50) | 16”x20” ($200) | 24”x30” ($1000)

In the newsletter, Sara writes:

Today’s photographer, 2010 Hot Shot Chikara Umihara, photographs what only he can photograph. To make Untitled, from the series Aggressive Girls and the other images in the series—a few of which are on view as part of the 2010 Hey, Hot Shot! Showcase at Jen Bekman Gallery—Chikara earned access and permission, through persistence and genuine interest, to document an underground community of lesbian women in Brooklyn who have adopted male-dominant hip hop culture as their own.

New on 20x200: Flora #2 by Christina Muraczewski

8.5”x11” ($20) | 11”x14” ($50) | 17”x22” ($200) | 30”x40” ($2000)

In the newsletter, Sara writes:

To say that this print packs a punch is a little bit of an understatement. I mean, look at it! True to form, Christina Muraczewski has laid it on thick in her newest edition, Flora #2. And with everything that’s going on today, the timing couldn’t be better to be sharing this layered burst of loveliness with all of you.

Ms. Muraczewski was one of the very first artists to release an edition on 20x200 and has graced us with her presence every so often since. Jen’s a big fan of the clever faux bois that papers the backgrounds of her compositions. That’s where Chrissy’s smart surface interpretations begin but her blending of real and fake extends to the objects painted over them. The flowers, birds, polka-dots and patterns are borrowed from the design language of desire that we’re all vaguely (if not intimately) familiar with, thanks to Ikea, Crate & Barrel, and the like.