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Collocation No. 14 (NATURE) Left Panel, Collocation No. 14 (NATURE) Right Panel, MORE BOOKS, and WORD STUDY by Mickey Smith
 As we slowly replace printed books with digital versions, conceptual artist and photographer Mickey Smith has made it her mission to document bound periodicals and professional journals in public libraries. Some of the volumes she has captured have already been destroyed. “I am struck by the physical mass of knowledge and the tenuousness of printed work as it fades from public consciousness,” says Smith. 
Collocation No. 14 (NATURE) Left Panel, Collocation No. 14 (NATURE) Right Panel, MORE BOOKS, and WORD STUDY by Mickey Smith
 As we slowly replace printed books with digital versions, conceptual artist and photographer Mickey Smith has made it her mission to document bound periodicals and professional journals in public libraries. Some of the volumes she has captured have already been destroyed. “I am struck by the physical mass of knowledge and the tenuousness of printed work as it fades from public consciousness,” says Smith. 
Collocation No. 14 (NATURE) Left Panel, Collocation No. 14 (NATURE) Right Panel, MORE BOOKS, and WORD STUDY by Mickey Smith
 As we slowly replace printed books with digital versions, conceptual artist and photographer Mickey Smith has made it her mission to document bound periodicals and professional journals in public libraries. Some of the volumes she has captured have already been destroyed. “I am struck by the physical mass of knowledge and the tenuousness of printed work as it fades from public consciousness,” says Smith. 
Collocation No. 14 (NATURE) Left Panel, Collocation No. 14 (NATURE) Right Panel, MORE BOOKS, and WORD STUDY by Mickey Smith
 As we slowly replace printed books with digital versions, conceptual artist and photographer Mickey Smith has made it her mission to document bound periodicals and professional journals in public libraries. Some of the volumes she has captured have already been destroyed. “I am struck by the physical mass of knowledge and the tenuousness of printed work as it fades from public consciousness,” says Smith. 

Collocation No. 14 (NATURE) Left Panel, Collocation No. 14 (NATURE) Right Panel, MORE BOOKS, and WORD STUDY by Mickey Smith

 As we slowly replace printed books with digital versions, conceptual artist and photographer Mickey Smith has made it her mission to document bound periodicals and professional journals in public libraries. Some of the volumes she has captured have already been destroyed. “I am struck by the physical mass of knowledge and the tenuousness of printed work as it fades from public consciousness,” says Smith. 

Slurp and Salty by Michelle Vaughan
An oyster lover, artist Michelle Vaughan uses text to capture the action of eating the popular shellfish. And the delicate pink coloring? Vaughan chose this shade for its resemblance to the interiors of oyster shells. Even the Hamilton Gothic typeface, originally owned by the Baltimore Police Department, is meant to evoke Vaughan’s favorite food. “It is a clean, honest face for everyday use,” says the artist. “Oysters were once the everyman’s food, eaten by rich and poor alike—Gothic symbolizes this spirit.”
Prints of these editions begin at $60. 
Slurp and Salty by Michelle Vaughan
An oyster lover, artist Michelle Vaughan uses text to capture the action of eating the popular shellfish. And the delicate pink coloring? Vaughan chose this shade for its resemblance to the interiors of oyster shells. Even the Hamilton Gothic typeface, originally owned by the Baltimore Police Department, is meant to evoke Vaughan’s favorite food. “It is a clean, honest face for everyday use,” says the artist. “Oysters were once the everyman’s food, eaten by rich and poor alike—Gothic symbolizes this spirit.”
Prints of these editions begin at $60. 

Slurp and Salty by Michelle Vaughan

An oyster lover, artist Michelle Vaughan uses text to capture the action of eating the popular shellfish. And the delicate pink coloring? Vaughan chose this shade for its resemblance to the interiors of oyster shells. Even the Hamilton Gothic typeface, originally owned by the Baltimore Police Department, is meant to evoke Vaughan’s favorite food. “It is a clean, honest face for everyday use,” says the artist. “Oysters were once the everyman’s food, eaten by rich and poor alike—Gothic symbolizes this spirit.”

Prints of these editions begin at $60. 

Apart Push Lawn Mower and Old Push Lawn Mower by Todd McLellan
When this old lawn mower was thrown away, its pieces were still in working order. Part of artist Todd McLellan’s Disassembly series, these intriguing images examine—piece by piece—beautifully built machines that have been replaced by newer technology.
Prints of these editions begin at $24. 
Apart Push Lawn Mower and Old Push Lawn Mower by Todd McLellan
When this old lawn mower was thrown away, its pieces were still in working order. Part of artist Todd McLellan’s Disassembly series, these intriguing images examine—piece by piece—beautifully built machines that have been replaced by newer technology.
Prints of these editions begin at $24. 

Apart Push Lawn Mower and Old Push Lawn Mower by Todd McLellan

When this old lawn mower was thrown away, its pieces were still in working order. Part of artist Todd McLellan’s Disassembly series, these intriguing images examine—piece by piece—beautifully built machines that have been replaced by newer technology.

Prints of these editions begin at $24. 

Filter Samples by Jessica Eaton

Who would have imagined that humble filter samples could used to create such a vivacious, cheerful work of art? Artist Jessica Eaton’s attempts to construct fictional rainbows yielded Filter Samples. “Hundreds of swatches from Lee Filters sample packs were arranged on the window, by spectral wave transmission, to turn my living room into a ROYGBIV light box,” says Eaton.

Prints of this edition begin at $60

How It Works by Austin Kleon

To create his famous Newspaper Blackout Poems, artist Austin Kleon “blacks out” newspaper articles with a marker, creating poetry out of the words that remain. “How it works: I will give you whatever you want for all the cartwheels you’re doing for me,” Kleon unearths from an article about hedge fund investing. “Like many of my poems, it’s about my wife,” he sweetly explains.  This romantic print is among our special Valentine’s Day selections—see them all here.

Prints of this edition begin at $60. Check out Austin Kleon’s excellent Tumblrs, newspaperblackout.com and tumblr.austinkleon.com.

Atari by Hollis Brown Thornton

Artist Hollis Brown Thornton is borne back ceaselessly into our digital past. “The collection of games is a tribute to these digital origins, as well as a tribute to the excellent artwork on these worn out cartridges,” says Thornton.

Do you have fond memories of playing these games? Are any of the cartridges still in your possession?

Prints of this edition begin at $60

Watercolor Sydney by Stamen Design

It’s almost Australia Day, the antipodean continent’s version of Independence Day, commemorating the arrival of 11 really big ships into Botany Bay and the emergence of a new southern nation. Today, 20x200’s two resident Aussies—Matthew Tribe (Sydney) and Emma Pearse (Canberra)—compare memories with Watercolor Sydney, a vibrant rendering of Sydney, Australia, where the famed harbor is sparkling and where, at this time of year, locals are getting around in flip-flops. Keep reading.

Prints of this edition begin at $24

Untitled #6 by Jessica Bruah

What story does this image tell? Artist Jessica Bruah began her project Stories, from which this image is taken, as a way to merge her interests in writing and photography. “The work is influenced by the formal qualities of short fiction and its tendency to focus on a single mood or event,” says Bruah.

This enigmatic photograph contains elements that could be innocuous or sinister, depending on the tale created by the viewer. For what purpose will the gasoline can be used?

Prints of this edition begin at  $60

Disassembled by Ky Anderson

Ah, the human eye, which searcges for reflections of itself everywhere it looks. It’s a figure—or is it a figure eight? An hourglass, or perhaps the infinity symbol? Ky Anderson calls today’s edition Disassembled, and indeed, this image is made of disparate parts as compelling as they are just out of reach. The pale and dark blue and bright yellow forms that seem to float through this forthrightly posed figure could be layers in a color chart, but they might also suggest sky and water, maybe a sun-baked beach. Inside the confident lines are curlicued wisps of white that could be thoughts as much as clouds—contained chaos amid the work’s initial idea of order. Keep reading.

Prints of this edition begin at $24