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Eighth Avenue and Central Park by Joseph O. Holmes
Every picture tells a story, true. But Eighth Avenue and Central Park, the 23rd and 24th 20x200 editions (!!!) by chronicler-of-NYC Joseph O. Holmes, have an especially intriguing genesis. We might never see the likes of them again, so read on for the back story of how they came to be. Keep reading.
Prints of these editions begin at $60. 
Eighth Avenue and Central Park by Joseph O. Holmes
Every picture tells a story, true. But Eighth Avenue and Central Park, the 23rd and 24th 20x200 editions (!!!) by chronicler-of-NYC Joseph O. Holmes, have an especially intriguing genesis. We might never see the likes of them again, so read on for the back story of how they came to be. Keep reading.
Prints of these editions begin at $60. 

Eighth Avenue and Central Park by Joseph O. Holmes

Every picture tells a story, true. But Eighth Avenue and Central Park, the 23rd and 24th 20x200 editions (!!!) by chronicler-of-NYC Joseph O. Holmes, have an especially intriguing genesis. We might never see the likes of them again, so read on for the back story of how they came to be. Keep reading.

Prints of these editions begin at $60

Tenth Avenue and 22nd Street and Cranberry and Henry, Brooklyn Heights by Jorge Colombo
“For years and years I have prowled cities for moments such as these,” says artist Jorge Colombo of his distinctive cityscapes. He created these beloved images—Tenth Avenue and 22nd Street graced the cover of the New Yorker—using an iPhone. See more of his work.
Tenth Avenue and 22nd Street and Cranberry and Henry, Brooklyn Heights by Jorge Colombo
“For years and years I have prowled cities for moments such as these,” says artist Jorge Colombo of his distinctive cityscapes. He created these beloved images—Tenth Avenue and 22nd Street graced the cover of the New Yorker—using an iPhone. See more of his work.

Tenth Avenue and 22nd Street and Cranberry and Henry, Brooklyn Heights by Jorge Colombo

“For years and years I have prowled cities for moments such as these,” says artist Jorge Colombo of his distinctive cityscapes. He created these beloved images—Tenth Avenue and 22nd Street graced the cover of the New Yorker—using an iPhone. See more of his work.

Charlie Looking Out the Window of the Statue of Liberty Ferry February 1985 by Camilo José Vergara

Camilo José Vergara’s career began in 1965 when a professor lent him $170 to buy his first camera, a Pentax Spotmatic. Leaving his native Chile for college in Indiana, Vergara discovered the thrill of street photography.

Charlie Looking Out the Window of the Statue of Liberty Ferry February 1985 is an unusual meeting of the personal and the public—it is a portrait of Vergara’s son enjoying a family day out, looking out onto what is now the most loaded section of New York’s storied skyline. Vergara’s subject is rarely himself or his family. As always, though, his focus is on the “built environment” as a reflection of urban life. Vergara, here, is telling this story through New York’s urbanscape.

This image is part of Art for Sandy Relief, a collaboration by 20x200 and TIME’s photo editors. All net proceeds from the 12 prints in this series go to 6 local organizations working directly to help Sandy survivors. Get this work.

Let’s feed New York City with New York City art!


We’re donating all net proceeds from sales of our awesome array of NYC-centric art to Citymeals-on-Wheels through Monday, November 5. And to thank you for your generosity, we’ll take 20% off framing for our NYC prints through Monday as well. We’ve raised more than $7,000 for Sandy relief fund, so thank you, collectors! Learn more here.

Orchard Beach, Row Boats, 1938 by 20x200 Artist Fund

In the newsletter, Jennifer writes:

Part of the fun of our public domain editions, we think, is learning something about what it is we are seeing. And even the most been-there-done-that New Yorkers among us never cease to be amazed at how much more can still be uncovered and discovered about the place we call home. In one of our recently-released historical editions, we learned you can golf in the Bronx. Turns out (for those of us who didn’t know), there’s a public beach in the borough, too.

Watercolor New York by Stamen Design | Buy the limited-edition art on 20x200.com here.

In the newsletter, Charlie writes:

The latest from San Francisco-based design and technology studio Stamen Design is a series of new maps they’re calling Watercolor. We’re kicking off the series with Watercolor New York, which was brilliantly constructed with a combination of data from OpenStreetMap and hand-painted tiles.


In September 2006, I spent 10 days shooting the interior of legendary NYC rock club CBGB. Six weeks later the club closed its doors forever, and the fabled walls and stage were dismantled. A year after that, as former owner Hilly Kristal succumbed to cancer, a high-end clothing store negotiated to take over the space.
The club had been a favorite venue for countless rock and punk acts, but for those few days my experience of the club was the exact opposite of most people’s. I came to look forward to my visits as a time of peaceful solitude. I arrived each morning at 11:00 with my tripod and camera, greeted Hilly at his desk, and then passed into a silent and empty club. During the following three to five hours of shooting, I rarely saw another human. The club was so dark, even during the day, that I had to carry a flashlight. After framing each shot, I took five to seven bracketed exposures, with each exposure lasting as long as 30 seconds, and I ended up with more than 1800 individual frames.
And that’s how I came to spend hour after hour sitting stock still in CBGB, alone in the dark among the empty beer bottles and broken guitar strings and abandoned drum sticks, waiting in the silence for the shutter to close.
- Joseph O. Holmes

Buy this art at 20x200
Details on the CBGB Festival kicking off this week

In September 2006, I spent 10 days shooting the interior of legendary NYC rock club CBGB. Six weeks later the club closed its doors forever, and the fabled walls and stage were dismantled. A year after that, as former owner Hilly Kristal succumbed to cancer, a high-end clothing store negotiated to take over the space.
The club had been a favorite venue for countless rock and punk acts, but for those few days my experience of the club was the exact opposite of most people’s. I came to look forward to my visits as a time of peaceful solitude. I arrived each morning at 11:00 with my tripod and camera, greeted Hilly at his desk, and then passed into a silent and empty club. During the following three to five hours of shooting, I rarely saw another human. The club was so dark, even during the day, that I had to carry a flashlight. After framing each shot, I took five to seven bracketed exposures, with each exposure lasting as long as 30 seconds, and I ended up with more than 1800 individual frames.
And that’s how I came to spend hour after hour sitting stock still in CBGB, alone in the dark among the empty beer bottles and broken guitar strings and abandoned drum sticks, waiting in the silence for the shutter to close.
- Joseph O. Holmes

Buy this art at 20x200
Details on the CBGB Festival kicking off this week

In September 2006, I spent 10 days shooting the interior of legendary NYC rock club CBGB. Six weeks later the club closed its doors forever, and the fabled walls and stage were dismantled. A year after that, as former owner Hilly Kristal succumbed to cancer, a high-end clothing store negotiated to take over the space.
The club had been a favorite venue for countless rock and punk acts, but for those few days my experience of the club was the exact opposite of most people’s. I came to look forward to my visits as a time of peaceful solitude. I arrived each morning at 11:00 with my tripod and camera, greeted Hilly at his desk, and then passed into a silent and empty club. During the following three to five hours of shooting, I rarely saw another human. The club was so dark, even during the day, that I had to carry a flashlight. After framing each shot, I took five to seven bracketed exposures, with each exposure lasting as long as 30 seconds, and I ended up with more than 1800 individual frames.
And that’s how I came to spend hour after hour sitting stock still in CBGB, alone in the dark among the empty beer bottles and broken guitar strings and abandoned drum sticks, waiting in the silence for the shutter to close.
- Joseph O. Holmes

Buy this art at 20x200
Details on the CBGB Festival kicking off this week

In September 2006, I spent 10 days shooting the interior of legendary NYC rock club CBGB. Six weeks later the club closed its doors forever, and the fabled walls and stage were dismantled. A year after that, as former owner Hilly Kristal succumbed to cancer, a high-end clothing store negotiated to take over the space.
The club had been a favorite venue for countless rock and punk acts, but for those few days my experience of the club was the exact opposite of most people’s. I came to look forward to my visits as a time of peaceful solitude. I arrived each morning at 11:00 with my tripod and camera, greeted Hilly at his desk, and then passed into a silent and empty club. During the following three to five hours of shooting, I rarely saw another human. The club was so dark, even during the day, that I had to carry a flashlight. After framing each shot, I took five to seven bracketed exposures, with each exposure lasting as long as 30 seconds, and I ended up with more than 1800 individual frames.
And that’s how I came to spend hour after hour sitting stock still in CBGB, alone in the dark among the empty beer bottles and broken guitar strings and abandoned drum sticks, waiting in the silence for the shutter to close.
- Joseph O. Holmes

Buy this art at 20x200
Details on the CBGB Festival kicking off this week

In September 2006, I spent 10 days shooting the interior of legendary NYC rock club CBGB. Six weeks later the club closed its doors forever, and the fabled walls and stage were dismantled. A year after that, as former owner Hilly Kristal succumbed to cancer, a high-end clothing store negotiated to take over the space.

The club had been a favorite venue for countless rock and punk acts, but for those few days my experience of the club was the exact opposite of most people’s. I came to look forward to my visits as a time of peaceful solitude. I arrived each morning at 11:00 with my tripod and camera, greeted Hilly at his desk, and then passed into a silent and empty club. During the following three to five hours of shooting, I rarely saw another human. The club was so dark, even during the day, that I had to carry a flashlight. After framing each shot, I took five to seven bracketed exposures, with each exposure lasting as long as 30 seconds, and I ended up with more than 1800 individual frames.

And that’s how I came to spend hour after hour sitting stock still in CBGB, alone in the dark among the empty beer bottles and broken guitar strings and abandoned drum sticks, waiting in the silence for the shutter to close.

- Joseph O. Holmes

Buy this art at 20x200

Details on the CBGB Festival kicking off this week