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How It Works by Austin Kleon

To create his famous Newspaper Blackout Poems, artist Austin Kleon “blacks out” newspaper articles with a marker, creating poetry out of the words that remain. “How it works: I will give you whatever you want for all the cartwheels you’re doing for me,” Kleon unearths from an article about hedge fund investing. “Like many of my poems, it’s about my wife,” he sweetly explains.  This romantic print is among our special Valentine’s Day selections—see them all here.

Prints of this edition begin at $60. Check out Austin Kleon’s excellent Tumblrs, newspaperblackout.com and tumblr.austinkleon.com.

Creativity is Subtraction and Open Road are part of Austin Kleon’s ongoing series of Newspaper Blackout Poems: poetry made by taking an article from the New York Times and blacking it out with a Sharpie marker, leaving only a few choice words behind. Find more art for word lovers, and take 25% off of your order of $100 or more through midnight ET with the code TICKTOCK. 
Creativity is Subtraction and Open Road are part of Austin Kleon’s ongoing series of Newspaper Blackout Poems: poetry made by taking an article from the New York Times and blacking it out with a Sharpie marker, leaving only a few choice words behind. Find more art for word lovers, and take 25% off of your order of $100 or more through midnight ET with the code TICKTOCK. 

Creativity is Subtraction and Open Road are part of Austin Kleon’s ongoing series of Newspaper Blackout Poems: poetry made by taking an article from the New York Times and blacking it out with a Sharpie marker, leaving only a few choice words behind. 

Find more art for word lovers, and take 25% off of your order of $100 or more through midnight ET with the code TICKTOCK. 

New on 20x200: Overheard on the Titanic by Austin Kleon

10”x8” ($20) | 14”x11” ($50) | 20”x16” ($200) 

In the newsletter, Jen writes:

I introduced Austin’s The Travelogue shortly after returning from my Austin-with-Austin travels and what I wrote back then is still the best description I can think of to describe why I find Austin’s work so enchanting:

His selection-by-omission practice is the semi-illogical next step in a process that I go through constantly, one which I’ve pursued, involuntarily at times, for as long as I can remember being able to read. Nearly all my reading is a swim against an undercurrent of my unending search for a motto, a rallying cry or a mantra. Whether it’s a poignant refrain of a pop song, a quote from a dead person or a few lines swiped from an admired poet, my constant search for a few good words is… constant. But, my ceaseless scanning of a page for a string of resonant words is thoroughly trumped by Austin’s talent for stringing them together. He doesn’t find poetry, he makes it—and he doesn’t just make it, he publishes it. Which is to say that this creative-writing-major-with-a-concentration-in-poetry college dropout makes me both green with envy and glowing with pride.