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Salty by Michelle Vaughan. Celebrate National Oyster Day with her letterpress editions!

These prints use text to describe the action of eating. This series was handset from woodblock type on a vintage Vandercook letterpress at The Arm in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, a haven for this rapidly disappearing craft. The custom Verona pink-colored ink represents the interior of oyster shells. The Hamilton Gothic (also known as Franklin Gothic) type, from the 1920s, was originally owned by the Baltimore Police Department. It is a clean, honest face for everyday use. Oysters were once the everyman’s food, eaten by rich and poor alike—Gothic symbolizes this spirit.

Untitled (My bad) by Mike Monteiro

Paired: 
Mike Monteiro + Kenneth Koch

Variations On A Theme By William Carlos Williams

1
I chopped down the house that you had been saving to live in next summer.
I am sorry, but it was morning, and I had nothing to do
and its wooden beams were so inviting.

2
We laughed at the hollyhocks together
and then I sprayed them with lye.
Forgive me. I simply do not know what I am doing.

3
I gave away the money that you had been saving to live on for the
next ten years.
The man who asked for it was shabby
and the firm March wind on the porch was so juicy and cold.

4
Last evening we went dancing and I broke your leg.
Forgive me. I was clumsy and
I wanted you here in the wards, where I am the doctor! 

Kenneth Koch



In celebration of National Poetry Month, we’re introducing a new series called Paired, which will feature a 20x200 edition alongside a poem selected by a team member, friend, or collector each day in April.

Thank You by Trey Speegle

Paired: Trey Speegle + Sharon Olds


Poem of Thanks

Years later, long single, 
I want to turn to his departed back, 
and say, What gifts we had of each other! 
What pleasure - confiding, open-eyed, 
fainting with what we were allowed to stay up 
late doing. And you couldn’t say, 
could you, that the touch you had from me 
was other than the touch of one 
who could love for life - whether we were suited 
or not - for life, like a sentence. And now that I 
consider, the touch that I had from you 
became not the touch of the long view, but like the 
tolerant willingness of one 
who is passing through. Colleague of sand 
by moonlight - and by beach noonlight, once, 
and of straw, salt bale in a barn, and mulch 
inside a garden, between the rows - once- 
partner of up against the wall in that tiny 
bathroom with the lock that fluttered like a chrome 
butterfly beside us, hip-height, the familiar 
of our innocence, which was the ignorance 
of what would be asked, what was required, 
thank you for every hour. And I 
accept your thanks, as if it were 
a gift of yours, to give them - let’s part 
equals, as we were in every bed, pure 
equals of the earth.

Sharon Olds



In celebration of National Poetry Month, we’re introducing a new series called Paired, which will feature a 20x200 edition alongside a poem selected by a team member, friend, or collector each day in April.

Slurp and Salty by Michelle Vaughan
An oyster lover, artist Michelle Vaughan uses text to capture the action of eating the popular shellfish. And the delicate pink coloring? Vaughan chose this shade for its resemblance to the interiors of oyster shells. Even the Hamilton Gothic typeface, originally owned by the Baltimore Police Department, is meant to evoke Vaughan’s favorite food. “It is a clean, honest face for everyday use,” says the artist. “Oysters were once the everyman’s food, eaten by rich and poor alike—Gothic symbolizes this spirit.”
Prints of these editions begin at $60. 
Slurp and Salty by Michelle Vaughan
An oyster lover, artist Michelle Vaughan uses text to capture the action of eating the popular shellfish. And the delicate pink coloring? Vaughan chose this shade for its resemblance to the interiors of oyster shells. Even the Hamilton Gothic typeface, originally owned by the Baltimore Police Department, is meant to evoke Vaughan’s favorite food. “It is a clean, honest face for everyday use,” says the artist. “Oysters were once the everyman’s food, eaten by rich and poor alike—Gothic symbolizes this spirit.”
Prints of these editions begin at $60. 

Slurp and Salty by Michelle Vaughan

An oyster lover, artist Michelle Vaughan uses text to capture the action of eating the popular shellfish. And the delicate pink coloring? Vaughan chose this shade for its resemblance to the interiors of oyster shells. Even the Hamilton Gothic typeface, originally owned by the Baltimore Police Department, is meant to evoke Vaughan’s favorite food. “It is a clean, honest face for everyday use,” says the artist. “Oysters were once the everyman’s food, eaten by rich and poor alike—Gothic symbolizes this spirit.”

Prints of these editions begin at $60. 

Get Excited And Make Things by Matt Jones

The original “Keep Calm and Carry On” image was designed in 1939 to soothe and encourage the British public in the face of a possible Nazi invasion.  This version by Matt Jones offers a more artful form of motivation, and we hope it inspires you.  

YES (You Complete the Picture) by Trey Speegle

This work of art by Trey Speegle radiates joy in every vibrant plane of color—even the rain puddles are cheerful. And through Sunday night, you can take 15% off a framed print of this work, as well as all of the other pieces in our special selection of art for Valentine’s Day. Use the code OUQT at checkout; find details about the sale here

Untitled (I like you ‘cause you like me and you don’t like much.) by Mike Monteiro

This warmhearted work of art was created by 20x200 artist Mike Monteiro, who has a way with words.

Through Sunday night, take 15% off a framed print of this work, as well as the others in our Valentine’s Day selection when you enter the code OUQT at checkout. Learn more about the sale here